Partnership lessons every entrepreneur needs to learn from Omoni Oboli and Jude Idada’s court fracas over Okafor’s Law

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While a press release from Omoni Oboli’s media team has been making the rounds stating that Okafor’s Law has been enjoying impressive views at cinemas with tickets being sold out ever since it was premiered (no thanks to the controversy that greeted it premiere), now  might be a good time to appraise some partnership lessons entrepreneurs can glean off the gaffe made by both parties.

Do not partner with the wrong person:

The mistake most entrepreneurs make when looking for partners, is to focus on competence alone. While competence is important, other factors like availability and commitment are as important.

The immense advantages that come with having the right partner on a business cannot be overemphasized. Many businesses today continue to enjoy success because of the different skillset their partners bring to fore. However, as good as this sounds, the ocean of partnership is one that needs careful, intentional, and clear thinking before one wades into it. Lest one ends up with in the wrong bed just like Omoni Oboli and Jude Idada over Okafor’s Law. The mistake most entrepreneurs make when looking for partners, is to focus on competence alone. While competence is important, other factors like availability and commitment are equally as important. With Jude Idada and Omoni Oboli’s partnership, the question wasn’t about competence (both are mavens in their space), rather it was a case of availability and commitment. How so? Going by the interview granted by both parties, it was clear from the outset that Jude was too busy to dedicate (full) attention to Omoni’s project.  Both of them did attest to the fact that Omoni made several attempts to get his attention on the project but he was caught up in a lot at the moment. At the end, a shoddy arrangement was made because of Omoni’s insistence and persistence to work with Jude given his reputation as an award-winning scriptwriter.

As an entrepreneur, in choosing a partner, while competence is key, availability and commitment are the lubricants that ensure a smooth opening of frontiers.

Okafor's Law

Clear cut agreement from the outset:                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

No matter how trivial a partnership deal looks, insofar, intellectual property is involved, there should be a clear-cut agreement document stating the modalities and conditions of the partnership. Omoni got this wrong from the outset, she failed to state the condition on which she was working with Jude. Was it a work-for-hire, or collaboration/ joint ownership agreement; none of this was stated. Thus she had no proof to debunk Jude’s claim that she stole his idea. Once partners agree to come together on a project, it is imperative to have a written document duly signed by both parties starting the modalities, and conditions of partnership

 


Note: This article was inspired by this post


 

 

 

 

 

happywheels

I'm interested in stories, news and opportunities for African entrepreneurs. Be it tech, fashion, SMEs; breaking entrepreneurship stories is the next best thing that can happen to me, after Jollof

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